Pozole

From David Hammond

Serves (his words) a medium-sized hipster bar

Says David: “The better the pork, the better the pozole. Last year, we ate all of Ermine (our Mulefoot hog), so this year I looked to Wettstein’s for high-quality pig meat to put in my pozole. I like a little tooth in my hominy; if you like yours softer, cook it longer. You will need one 5-gallon pot and one 3-gallon pot for this recipe.”

Ingredients

3 pounds of pork soup bones (knuckles, ribs, neck)
2.5 pounds of pork shoulder
1 bay leaf
5 cloves garlic
2 medium onions
1 carrot
3 pounds hominy
4 tablespoons cal (lye)
9 fresh jalapenos (charred, peeled and chopped)
12 chiles de arbol (crumbled)
2 teaspoons oregano
4 teaspoons cumin
4 tablespoons chili powder
water
salt to taste

Preparation

Roast pork bones and meat at 350 degrees for about 45 minutes.

Put bones and meat in the 5-gallon pot filled almost to the top with water. Add bay leaf, 2 garlic cloves, 1 onion and carrot, and put everything in the oven at 200 degrees. After 8-10 hours, fish out all the solids. Pull the meat off the bones and reserve. Reduce the liquid over low heat for about five hours.

Put hominy and cal into the 3-gallon pot and cover with a few inches of water. Bring to a boil for 30 minutes, then turn off heat and let it sit for an hour. Rinse hominy in a colander. Clean out the pot. Then put rinsed hominy back into the cleaned pot, cover with a few inches of water, bring to a boil for 30 minutes and let it sit for an hour. Rinse thoroughly three times.

Add the meat along with jalapenos, chiles de arbol, the other onion, oregano, cumin and chili powder. Simmer everything together until the flavors have married, and it looks good enough to eat (around 90 minutes or so).

David Hammond writes the weekly “Food Detective” column in the Chicago Sun-Times and the weekly “Omnivorous in Oak Park” column for the Wednesday Journal. He is a regular contributor of food-related segments to Chicago Public Radio (91.5FM), and he is a founder/moderator of LTHForum.com, the Chicago-based culinary chat site.

Tags: ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: